Training for Time Crunched Cyclists – Jim Rutberg

Key Words: Training, Cycling, Busy People, Productivity, HIIT, Threshold, FTP

Jim Rutberg joins us today on the show to talk about the new 3rd edition of The Time Crunched Cyclist that is due out in March 2017. We talk about marketing/business practices for coaches, training tactics for those with limited time and what is new in the book, including strength training and a huge nutrition section.


BIO

jim-rutberg

Jim was a collegiate cyclist and raced after college as well before starting with CTS as a coach in 2000. He started writing books/web content and has written 8 books at this point on cycling and, recently, on ultra-running. His book ‘The Time Crunched Cyclist’, co-authored with Chris Carmichael, is a popular handbook for the busy athlete.

 
 

Questions 

Working in bigger coaching company
In CTS, can see how other coaches work with other athletes, good network of coaches and athletes
“Coaching can be a hard industry to make a living in”
good / bad practices for coaching success
Success of a coach isn’t necessarily connected to coaching ability, a lot related to network/environmental factors
Common coach mistake:: people over-rely on science end of coaching vs personal. Don’t forget you’re dealing with a human
What is time crunched cyclist ?
Time Crunched: 6-8 hours per week available for training. Just don’t have enough training time for standard periodization plan
People who can’t do normal periodization don’t have the time or focus to make that work. Life has to be pretty predictable to make that work. The busier a person is, they have to prioritize something other than structured training.
Want people to perform well, have fun and be competitive in a reasonable time frame
Adapted to the reality of people’s lives
3rd edition changes
People have been following along for awhile, Low volume high intensity: people make slow progress cycle after cycle or use it periodically but at some point hit a limit on what they can do with the training alone with time limits / limits on intensity can handle in week
You reach a point where you can’t add more workload–no more room
Body weight becomes a factor: can improve power to weight and VO2max by losing weight
Most masters he works with only had 10-15lbs to lose.
Skip junk food/start exercising –this audience already doing it
Weight vs composition?
Always been a debate re weight training for endurance athletes
  – As we age, benefits to gaining muscle mass
  – Strength training becomes more important
  – Most people just want to stay fit and enjoy the ride, and be a well rounded human
   – Most people can fit body weight exercise into the day
Reverse periodization: harder efforts further away from the event, then volume
The TCC plan basically increases VO2max quick but it won’t be able to last long, fatigue builds quickly
In an optimal world, we do volume and endurance base training, the TCC largely excludes this except for blocks of endurance when time/vacation allows.
Most important thing for time crunched cyclist is CONSISTENCY. Maintain schedule even on easy weeks. Back off intensity, but stay on schedule
Would you rather be really good for a short period of time or mediocre all year?
Athlete identity is huge–but being an endurance athlete is really difficult
This sport is too hard to continue doing when it’s not fun, the TCC helps people go fast for a targeted time/duration as long as they take the rest between blocks and during week .
TCC Most Commonly misunderstood: 3 hour limit
In the book, the workouts get you ready for rides and races under 3 hours. And there’s this idea that if you can’t do an epic 6hr ride you’re not a real cyclist. Look at what you’re preparing for and what you want to be good at. You’re not getting shortchanged.
People are a little scared that somehow they’ll be at a disadvantage if they ride less hours. But difference can be quality. Someone can have more matches to burn but you still have matches. You just need to be smarter.
Strategies for when life gets in the way:
Fit it where you can
Start by carving out time that’s least likely to get interrupted
Restructure around schedules as possible (i.e. Doing recovery around a business trip)
Don’t stress about missing an occasional workout. We’re not getting paid for this.
If fitting a workout in is a stressor versus a stress relief mechanism, need to look at why we’re doing things
Total stress on body is what matters, not exercise stress
Oftentimes, family is happier when athlete is on a training plan and not stressing about what to be doing–can just do it!
Sometimes the answer is making it ok to not do something, or taking more rest. (Can be antithetical to how Type A people think and act)! You need to get a person out of their own way
The longer you work with the athlete, the less the conversation has to do with training!
New workouts in 3rd edition?
Irony is writing a 3rd edition is that it has doubled in size now!430 pages
With each edition, added training plans. This edition rearranged them and added.
Training plans divided by time and style, from criterium to CX to centuries to endurance MTB (long endurance still surprises people)
“You may not have the fastest 12hr race but you can be ready for it”
Added in 2 Michelin star chefs with some recipes that fit in with eating behaviors discussed in book–eating healthy but tasty can improve morale!
How to get book?

Tracey Drews – Best Training for Older Athletes, Decrease Nerves on Testing Days

Avoid Testing-Day Nerves, Training for older athletes, Weight-Loss

This week we talk to Tracey Drews, a coach with CTS. Tracey works with athletes of all types but has had great success with masters athletes who aim to pursue peak performance in their sport. There are topics for all athletes this week including beating testing nerves, how to loose weight, and how to become a coach.

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Continue reading Tracey Drews – Best Training for Older Athletes, Decrease Nerves on Testing Days